travel by car with medical oxygen

A great resource over at on the safety tips of travelling with oxygen.

car travel with oxygenDo’s

  • DO fill the portable tank carefully, if using liquid oxygen. Liquid oxygen is extremely cold and can injure your hands, if frost should develop.
  • DO carry your portable tank only in the case supplied with it.
  • DO use a cart or holster to carry portable oxygen cylinders.
  • DO keep your oxygen delivery system out of the bright sunlight or other heat sources.
  • DO secure your tank, cylinder or portable concentrator so it does not roll around in the car. Liquid tanks should never be laid on their sides; portable cylinders may be.
  • DO bring extra batteries to power your concentrator.


  • DON’T put a portable tank inside a backpack or other carry bag.
  • DON’T place your tank, cylinder or portable concentrator in a car trunk or other tightly enclosed space.

There are quite a few DO’s for you to remember and t is always best to be prepared before embarking on a week or two away on holiday. Any advice needed on arranging oxygen please do just speak with the team at OxygenWorldwide.




The CF gene = low levels of oxygen

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease that is inherited from your biological parents and occurs because of abnormalities in our genes. The CF gene is the instructions on how to build a channel (or pore) in our cells that allows salt to move into and out of the cell.  This salt channel is called CFTR, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.  A mutation in this gene means that this salt channel does not work properly.

The lungs are the most commonly affected organ in patients with cystic fibrosis. As a result, patients with CF can have a chronic cough, phlegm production, shortness of breath, chest tightness, sinus problems and occasionally cough up blood.

A standard treatment regimen includes:

  • airway clearance and exercise,
  • chest physiotherapy,
  • anti-inflammatory agents,
  • supplemental oxygen, and
  • nutritional support.

Nearly half of CF sufferers report poor sleep quality. Your oxygen levels may lower during an exacerbation and this is most noticeable during sleep. In some people these changes in breathing and oxygen during sleep can affect their performance during the day. They may have difficulties with concentration, memory and feeling tired during the day. People who have low oxygen levels while awake will usually also have low oxygen levels during sleep. In some cases, patients who may not require oxygen while awake may need extra oxygen while sleeping.

Individuals with CF can have low levels of oxygen in their bodies and some need to use supplemental oxygen to bring their oxygen levels up to a healthier level.  Supplemental oxygen protects the body from the effects of low oxygen levels. It also helps your body to function better and allows you to stay more active. Some individuals only need oxygen when they are active or while sleeping, however, in most cases, oxygen should be used 24 hours a day.

In honour of COPD Awareness Month

As November marked National COPD Awareness Month we thought it gave justice to another article! An internationally-recognized event held annually to enhance exposure around chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The main cause of COPD is tobacco smoke or exposure to air pollutants like cigarette smoke or outdoor pollution in the home or at work, family history, and respiratory infections like pneumonia also increase your risk.

Symptoms of COPD include:

  • Frequent coughing or wheezing
  • Excess phlegm or sputum
  • Shortness of breath
  • Trouble taking a deep breath

If you experience these symptoms, you should discuss them with your GP. One way to treat COPD is supplemental oxygen from a portable oxygen tank if blood oxygen levels are low.



Christmas trees could trigger deadly asthma attacks, doctors have warned.


The festive fir in the corner of your living room harbours mould, which can aggravate the lungs.

Leading charity Asthma UK has urged people to be vigilant over the Christmas period.

Their data shows around 300 people are admitted to hospital on Christmas Day each year, suffering severe attacks, that could be linked to the festive favourite.

Mould that naturally grows on your tree can multiply in the warm temperatures of your living room.

And fake trees aren’t the safe alternative they may seem to be, gathering dust and mould in the loft, that can aggravate the lungs.

But, those with allergies as well as asthma sufferers should be alert to the dangers, Asthma UK urged. The moulds are naturally occurring on the trees, but flourish when they are inside our toasty warm homes in the winter.

But the charity also warns that both real and fake trees can also pose a threat.


Fake trees are a great alternative if the allergens that form on a real tree cause you too many breathing difficulties.

But artificial trees, and decorations, can gather dust and mould when they are kept in storage for the year which can cause a flare-up of symptoms when you put it up.

So it’s a good idea to wipe them down when you pull it out of storage and wrap them in plastic to keep the dust at bay when you put them away again.





50 years ago, a spacecraft discovered oxygen in moon rocks

Space scientists have been intrigued for years with the possibility of finding usable oxygen on the moon — not in the lunar atmosphere, since there essentially is none, but in the rocks. As long ago as 1962 … [NASA researchers] predicted vast lunar processing plants turning out 4,000 pounds of liquid oxygen per month, both for breathing and as an oxidizer for rocket fuel…. Now the Surveyor 5 spacecraft … reveals it is standing directly over just the kind of rock that would do the job. — Science News, October 14, 1967


The moon is not yet dotted with lunar oxygen factories, but scientists are still devising ways to pull oxygen from moon rocks. One technique, proposed by NASA scientists in 2010, isolates oxygen by heating lunar rocks to over 1650° Celsius and exposing them to methane. Chemical reactions would produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which then react to create water. Passing an electric current through the water would separate oxygen from hydrogen, allowing the desired gas to be captured.

Excerpt from the October 14, 1967 issue of Science News

THE BEST supplements to boost your diet during dark winter months include vitamin D, which has now been found to protect against severe asthma attacks.

The best supplements to take during cold winter months include vitamin D due to the lack of sunshine.

However, a new study has found that topping up on the essential vitamin could also protect against severe asthma attacks too.

Asthma attacks can be more prevalent during winter because cold air in the airways can cause them to go into spasm, according to Asthma UK.

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London discovered that people who took oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve their risk of an asthma attack that required hospital attendance.

“On average, three people in the UK die from asthma attacks every day.

While getting vitamin D from sun exposure is the most efficient way to absorb it, people can struggle to get enough during the winter months and there is also the risk of skin cancer.



New Smartphone App Could Help COPD Patients

Enter a new smartphone app that aims to use technology to help COPD sufferers to recognize emergencies, and avoid unnecessary doctors’ or ER visits.



Ted Smith is the CEO of Revon Systems, a tech company based in East Louisville, and the developer of the “Smart COPD” app. The app is designed on a simple premise: that some of those emergency room visits could have been prevented if people were able to track their symptoms.

“The focus of the app is helping you keep track of whether your systems are starting to deteriorate so that you don’t have to get to a point where you have to go to the hospital for emergency care” Smith said.

When you open the app, it poses a series of questions: “Shortness of breath?” “Cough?” and “Running nose or feeling like you have a cold?” It also asks for temperature, and for users to punch in the readings from a separate device that measures oxygen saturation and heart rate.

Finally, the app evaluates the information and tells the user whether they need to head to the ER, call their doctor, check back in a few days or that no medical attention is needed.

It’s simple, and requires only a cell phone and a cheap finger oxygen and heart rate monitor.


“People have telephones, they’re our life line. So putting a self-management tool on a cell phone is just a genius idea,” Montague said.

He sees that as a possible opportunity for Smart COPD to reach more people with low-incomes.

“If there’s one thing I wish for, it’s that we take advantage of something we’re already paying for as a society and turn it into health care,” Smith said.

Interested? Search for ‘Revon Systems’ in your App store and look for the “Smart COPD” app.