Getting ‘high’ on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.

Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.

Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 


Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.

Eat slowly, and breathe evenly

Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.

 

ref: http://www.upmc.com

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The sun could help to treat asthma

The summer has finally started to rear its head and for many people who suffer from respiratory disease the summer months can potentially worsen their condition. An increase in air pollution, pollen, dust and other allergens can irritate the lungs and worsen breathing. The general advice is to stay indoors at peak pollen or air pollution times. However on the flip-side of this advice is that exposure to the sun may actually be good for you, especially asthma sufferers.

autumn-sun
A study by King’s College London has found that the Vitamin D that the sun provides may have a calming impact with asthma sufferers as Vitamin D helps to lower an asthmatic’s over-active part of their immune system.
Many asthmatics have high levels of Interleukin-17, which causes part of their immune system to be over-active and contributes to their respiratory reactions to allergens and is part of the cause of some asthma attacks. Some asthmatic sufferers do not respond to steroid treatment and find difficulty in managing their symptoms. This group of asthmatics tends to have very high levels of Interleukin-17.

Researchers have found that if Vitamin D levels are increased then this lowers the levels of Interleukin-17 and helps to calm down the immune system leading to a lessening of symptoms.
“We know people with high levels of vitamin D are better able to control their asthma – that connection is quite striking,” said researcher Prof Catherine Hawrylowicz.

The sun is an easy natural source of Vitamin D (the body can make Vitamin D in the presence of sunshine) rather than taking synthetic supplements so the more you are out in the sun, the more Vitamin D your body will get and the happier your immune system.
Many asthma sufferers also have concerns about the side effects of their medications so if Vitamin D is shown to improve their condition then many may have to rely less on medication and can improve their quality of life.

Researchers have suggested that covering up too much and using too much sun cream has actually contributed to increased asthma rates. Obviously too much sun is bad for you and you should ensure that you protect your skin to avoid sunburn and potential skin cancers.
So there needs to be a balance of going outside and increasing your levels of Vitamin D versus avoiding high pollen counts and sunburn.

Here are a few tips to help you enjoy the summer despite your condition:

•    Check the Air Quality Index: Avoid peak times or areas with poor air quality.
•    Always Take Your Medication:  Whether this is ant-histamines, inhalers, steroids or supplemental oxygen.

•    Check the Pollen Count: Try to avoid going out at times where pollen is particularly high.
•    Use Air Conditioning Instead of Opening Windows: Open windows will just allow more pollen and allergens into your home or the car.
•    Wash regularly: Washing your hair and clothes regularly gets rid of any allergens that may have settled on you.
•    Talk to your doctor for advice.

References:      http://www.healthoxygen.com and http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

Facial hair can be dangerous

Millions of people suffer with respiratory problems that require them to utilise home oxygen therapy. A portable device delivers oxygen-rich air via tubing to the nose to aid patients in increasing their oxygen intake.

hair-33224_640

After a trend was noticed in patients suffering from facial burns, research and studies have been carried out which suggest that men who use home oxygen therapy are at a higher risk of serious facial burns. A major factor involved was the presence of facial hair such as moustaches.

NASA had already investigated the fact that human hair ignites more readily in the presence of higher oxygen concentrations but no-one had previously looked into this within the context of oxygen therapy. To test their theory they used mannequins with nasal tubing and exposed them to a spark. Those mannequins with a moustache ignited whereas those without facial hair did not.

“If you’ve ever tried to start a camp fire, you always start with some dry little twigs and once that starts – and that’s kind of the moustache – then that oxygen tubing lights on fire, it’s like a blow torch shooting up their nose,” said Dr. Andrew Greenlund of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Moustaches and other facial hair can act as kindling for nasal oxygen tubes when a spark joins the mix, even if the spark is just a tiny ember that flies at an oxygen tank user from a match, grill or fireworks.

Avoiding a potential spark in the first place is paramount such as to not smoke whilst using oxygen therapy and to stay away from grinding metal and open flames. Being clean-shaven however would prevent facial burns if there was an accidental spark exposure. If your culture and religion allow it then shaving facial hair would be the main preventative measure in eliminating the risk of facial burns. However if a man decides to keep it then using water-based products rather than oil or alcohol-based ones would help to reduce the risk. Also the poly-vinyl tubing is highly flammable and ideas are being researched into changing the material that the tubing is made from so that it doesn’t burn as easily.

The burns that can occur from a single spark can be very severe and the burns can also travel beyond the external facial skin and cause damage to the inner nose, mouth and airways, causing swelling and tissue death. The degree of the burn can vary but can be serious enough to result in the patient being put on a ventilator whilst the burns heal. They can result in scarring and worsening of their health. The experience of being burnt can be emotionally stressful too, described by one victim as ‘like looking hell in the face.’

The incidence of facial burns have gradually been increasing as more people utilise oxygen therapy and are especially high in the winter, as more men tend to grow beards and moustaches during colder weather. Also the incidence of home fires in general have risen in homes where oxygen therapy is being used and the facial burns can result in a spark from that mini fire on a patient’s face catching other things in the home on fire such as clothing and fabrics.

However as long at users are aware, reduce all risk factors and are careful then there is nothing to worry about.

 

References: http://www.reuters.com and http://www.sciencedaily.com

Why do i need oxygen more in the summer?

inhaler

Do your asthma symptoms change with the seasons?

While the winter months can mean pesky infections and extreme cold temperatures (both potentially troublesome for asthma), summer can bring its own set of ‘triggers’ for the 5.4 million people living with the condition in the UK.

Pollen is thought to be a ‘hidden trigger’ for 80% of people with asthma, according to LloydsPharmacy, who report that last year, 91% of their asthma control tests (the high-street pharmacy offers an Asthma Treatment and Advice service) took place from March-May, peak hay-fever season. Furthermore, 46% of the tests carried out during that period found people were not controlling their asthma well.

If you have asthma and are prone to hay fever, or find your symptoms flare-up in spring and summer, it might be worth checking out some of the apps that monitor and alert you to pollen forecasts. And if you’re struggling to keep symptoms under control, speak to your nurse or GP.

Depending where you travel to, a holiday could mean a new set of triggers, especially if you’re in a new environment and climate that’s different to what you’re used to. Other people may find that changes in routine, location, temperature, or even air travel, can make their asthma symptoms worse

“The best thing people can do to prevent symptoms and attacks when they’re on holiday is to keep on top of their medicine routine.

Asthma UK has more advice about travelling with asthma on their website it’s always a good idea to carry your inhalers (and all your spare inhalers) in your hand luggage, in case your inhaler runs out or if your checked-in baggage goes missing.

Summer is all about letting your hair down and enjoying life – and there’s no reason your asthma should stop you. But, from smoky barbecues to greater exposure to air pollution if you’re pounding the pavements on days out, it’s a good idea to be aware of any potential summertime asthma triggers.

ref: http://www.nwemail.co.uk

Why outsourcing to oxygenworldwide.com will become inevitable…

The secret behind OxygenWorldwide.

world of medical oxygen
world of medical oxygen

Since the founders of OxygenWorldwide decided 12  years ago to take their business global, a unique concept came to light and started to divide the world.

Today, active in more than 120 countries, OxygenWorldwide 24/7 personal approach in a minimum of 5 languages and ónly in regards to oxygen has proven só effective that major gas companies are now looking into, or have already started, cost effective outsourcing  their enquiries for their own travelling patients to OxygenWorldwide. With a similar mission statement like Starbucks, OxygenWorldwide personal attention has not been left unnoticed by its clients.

Current developments in the medical oxygen equipment industry are expected to change this market in such way that it will be difficult for oxygen suppliers and their home-care divisions to keep up with necessities like providing assistance in various languages on a 24/7 bases for their relatively small group of patients travelling abroad.

Many of the oxygen users feel more comfortable travelling due to the latest inventions like electric portable oxygen concentrators (POCs). But as this seems fine for the actual journey they generally prove a high risk during more permanent use.

More travellers encounter more difficulties and become therefore ´expensive exercises´.

Today the oxygen world is divided into those who operate stagnant and outmoded call centres which cannot live-up to the multicultural requirements and those who can translate OxygenWorldwide´s vision into reality and understand the cost effectiveness of professional outsourcing. Are you ready for it too? Contact OxygenWorldwide now, they will be happy to visit and inform you about the possibilities. Contact Mr. Rutger Berntsen direct by e-mail: rutgerberntsen@oxygenworldwide.com or call to ++ 34 608 461 534.

The Facts

  • OxygenWorldwide celebrates it’s 25 birthday this year.
  • OxygenWorldwide call-centre is unique in the world as they ónly deal with oxygen with a 24/7 emergency service in a minimum of 5 languages.
  • OxygenWorldwide performs sustainable development in places that are in demand with travellers like Turkey and Dubai. 


OxygenWorldwide searches for the best prices and best service anywhere.

 

Does your crying make it hard to breathe?

Asthma  results in difficulty in breathing, cough, excessive mucus secretion, and wheezing sounds during breathing.

An episode of asthma can be induced by a variety of triggers. Broadly, they can be categorized into two types: external triggers and internal triggers.

A vast majority of asthma triggers are external – exposure to an allergen. Pollens, dust mites, cockroach parts, and the dander of rodents or of other animals are known allergens that affect many individuals. Another category of common allergens include pollutants in the air. Smoke from charcoal grills or open fires, strong fumes of chemicals such as gasoline and paints, or even strong scents of perfumes and soaps may induce irritation of airways in certain people.

Food ingredients comprise another category of external asthma triggers. Several people have been reported to be allergic to food substances such as peanuts, soy, eggs, shrimp, cow milk, fish, wheat, and certain fruits.

Strenuous exercise is also capable of inducing asthma by causing airway constriction (also referred to as “exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

In some patients with very sensitive respiratory systems, even minor changes in weather or climatic conditions such as a drop in temperature, rise in altitude, or change in humidity levels can induce severe asthma episodes acutely.

While most triggers for asthma are external, there are a few which are internal, and these may often be ignored while analyzing the condition’s etiology.

Expression of strong emotions is often associated with asthma. Intense anger, excitement, crying, as well as laughing may aggravate airway constriction. Crying also causes stuffiness of the nose in most individuals, and thus makes it more difficult for them to breathe.

 

ref: https://www.news-medical.net

Getting ‘high’ on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.

Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.

Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 


Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.

Eat slowly, and breathe evenly

Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.

 

ref: http://www.upmc.com