Interactive Medical Drones

By combining the two technologies, drones and telemedicine, a doctor miles away could instruct a layman at the scene in how to provide rudimentary, but perhaps life-saving, medical care.

Subbarao’s project, which he began the year after the Hattiesburg tornado, has now produced three prototypes and conducted several demonstration flights. It appears to be the most advanced attempt to equip a drone with audiovisual equipment so doctors and survivors can interact in an emergency.  Emergency management officials from Dallas, New York City, Phoenix and Washington, D.C., have reached out to him, as have officials from Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

 

Drone technology has been around for at least half a century, and for years people in health care have speculated about the medical use of drones, for example to transport medicines, organs for transplants, blood supplies and anti-venom serums.

Lee Smithson, director of the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, said, “This is going to be a phenomenal way to provide immediate medical attention anywhere in the state.” Noting Mississippi’s frequent poor rankings among states in measures of well-being, he added, “It’s about time that Mississippi leads the nation in something good for a change.”

The plan, Smithson said, is to eventually station a drone in as many as nine different areas of the state, so every place in Mississippi is within two hours of a medical drone.

Chris Sawyer, medical director of Remote Area Medical, isn’t surprised by the broad interest in the project. “It is revolutionary,” he said.

It’s also not altogether a surprise that the idea of an interactive medical drone arose in Mississippi. The state is frequently visited by tornadoes, some of which have caused substantial numbers of deaths and injuries. The state has a shortage of doctors and, according to Smithson, many areas of the state cannot be reached quickly by medical responders.

 

The current prototypes can only fly up to 5 miles, at speeds up to 40 mph, Lott says, but he’s working on another model that could travel far greater distances, up to 100 miles.

The drones carry a suitcase with medical supplies and equipment. The audiovisual equipment comes in two varieties: stand-alone cameras with microphones and speakers, and interactive goggles that can be worn by someone on the ground. In either case, a doctor from a remote location could instruct a survivor to train the camera on victims or parts of the body to assess their condition.

 

The doctor could give instructions on taking readings such as blood pressure, temperature, heart rate, or sugar or oxygen levels, using equipment dropped by the drone. And the doctor could talk a survivor through ways of giving aid, such as applying tourniquets, cleaning, clotting or bandaging wounds, and injecting medicines.

 

WILLIAM CAREY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

Reference:Huff Post

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Traveling with oxygen – you are in good hands

Needing medical oxygen in your life is not the end of getting around, travel, seeing the world or having fantastic vacations to the city breaks in Europe, long haul to live the dream (for 2 weeks at least) in the U. S of A. Wherever you decide to fly to and visit all you need is careful planning and Oxygen Worldwide.
Travelling as an oxygen user dependent on a source of oxygen, means that you will probably have lots of questions when thinking about going abroad – or you may never thought you could. Luckily, Oxygen Worldwide can help, advise and guide you to all those answers when it comes to travelling with oxygen, who deal with organising travel with oxygen 365 days of the year.

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But who are we?

Below is a short introduction to our company, the team and what we do and our speciality is due to our knowledge, success and partnership relationships with a network of suppliers across the globe.

  • Oxygen Worldwide is a company under Dutch management established in 1993.
  • Oxygen Worldwide is based in Spain and operates internationally.
  • Our objective is to make travel for those who need oxygen as carefree as possible.
  • All Oxygen Worldwide employees are multilingual. Our customer service staff speaks four languages.
  • Oxygen Worldwide arranges oxygen delivery worldwide for oxygen users on holiday or staying abroad for a longer period of time, also in case of a tour through several countries.
  • Oxygen Worldwide arranges oxygen for individual users, insurance agencies, emergency centres and oxygen suppliers in your home country. Oxygen Worldwide delivers liquid oxygen (LOX), cylinders and concentrators.
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If you have any question or would like to speak with us do not hesitate to contact our team at info@oxygenworldwide.com

Putting autistic children in oxygen chambers twice a day improves their symptoms, research finds

By Fiona Macrae

Oxygen chambers have been improving the symptoms of autistic children, like hyperactivity and anger, research has found (file photo)

Pressurised oxygen chambers, similar to those used by divers, could help treat autism, research shows.

Using a hyperbaric oxygen chamber twice a day for four weeks significantly improved the symptoms of autism in a group of five to seven year olds.

Improvements were seen in 80 per cent of those treated, with 30 per cent rated as ‘very much improved’ or ‘much improved’, the journal BMC Pediatrics reports.

Irritability and hyperactivity eased, while speech and social interaction improved in the youngsters treated in the chambers, which had higher than usual levels of oxygen.

It is unclear how the treatment works but it may be through raising oxygen levels in the brain, while suppressing inflammation and unwanted immune reactions.

The researchers, from the International Child Development Resource Centre in Florida, said the inclusion of dummy hyperbaric oxygen chambers as well as real ones made the results more reliable than those of previous studies.

They said: ‘In the light of the positive results of this study and those of several previous studies, the use of hyperbaric treatment appears to be a promising treatment for children with autism.’

They added that more research was needed to determine if the effects were long-lasting or if on-going treatment would be required.

Richard Mills, of Research Autism, welcomed the research but cautioned that parents can expect to pay thousands of pounds for a course of treatment.

He said: ‘Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been known to be beneficial with children and adults with a range of neurological conditions and there’s no reason to suppose some individuals with autism won’t show some benefit.

‘But it is not clear cut and parents should be aware of the costs and of the dangers.’

Side-effects include fits, short-sightedness and claustrophobia.