Oxygen therapy treat Alzheimer’s?

Breathing oxygen at a higher-than-normal air pressure might ease some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, if recent research done in mice has the same results in humans.

Mice genetically engineered to develop some human features of Alzheimer’s disease showed significant reductions in physical and behavioral symptoms after 2 weeks of daily treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).

This was the result that a team hailing from the University of Tel Aviv (TAU) in Israel reported in a paper that was published recently in the journal Neurobiology of Aging.

HBOT is a type of treatment during which the person breathes oxygen at a pressure that is greater than normal air pressure. The treatment, which is delivered inside a pressurized chamber, can cause the lungs to absorb up to three times more oxygen than usual.

The researchers note in their study paper that, while HBOT “has been used successfully to treat several neurological conditions,” its effects on Alzheimer’s disease “have never been thoroughly examined.”

In a hyperbaric oxygen chamber that they custom-built for the small animals, the researchers gave the transgenic mice 1 hour of HBOT every day for 14 days. They also gave another group of normal mice (the controls) the same treatment.

After this, the team observed the mice as they completed a number of behavioral tests. They also examined their brain tissue for effects of the treatment on the physical hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. They compared the results with the control mice.

The researchers’ analysis showed various biological and biochemical signs that HBOT had reduced inflammation in the brain.

 

The team suggests that the findings show that HBOT shows promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, especially given that it “is used in the clinic to treat various indications, including neurological conditions.”

 

references https://www.medicalnewstoday.com

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People with arthritis are nearly 50% more likely to develop COPD

People living with arthritis are at greater risk of a deadly lung disease, it has been warned.

The 400,000 people with rheumatoid arthritis in Britain, and 50 million in the US, are almost 50 per cent more likely to end up with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the results of a new study.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term illness in which the immune system causes the body to attack itself, causing painful, swollen and stiff joints.

But the extra problems come from the inflammation it causes in those joints.

The authors of the study, published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, say people with arthritis should be vigilant in looking for the first signs of COPD, which is the second most common lung disease after asthma in Britain.

The researchers followed 24,625 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 25,396 people who were free of the condition to record how many were hospitalised with COPD.

While it was once thought COPD was caused by inflammation in the lungs specifically, experts now think inflammation elsewhere in the body could also be a trigger.

Dr Lacaille added: ‘Our results emphasize the need to control inflammation, and in fact to aim for complete eradication of inflammation through effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5001156/Arthritis-raises-risk-deadly-lung-disease.html#ixzz4wGnGRubq

Get stronger lungs with these exercises!!

Exercise is a fanastic way to help strengthen muscles and improve heart function all at the same time. It will also give a person overall health benefits and motivation to feel good.



So how does this help you if you have a condition like asthma?

There are breathing exercises that, like aerobic exercises, can strengthen the lungs to relieve asthma symptoms or, in some cases, even prevent the recurrence of asthma attacks.

To make up for the lessened functionality of the lungs through asthma, the body uses other muscles for breathing – such as your neck, back and chest. This, however, doesn’t assist with breathing; it only adds more stress to your body, which is not good for people living with asthma.

With the following breathing exercises, asthma patients can strengthen their lungs and, thus, improve their breathing.

Pursed-Lip Breathing
With a pursed lip, breathe into your nose and breathe out at least twice through your mouth.

Belly Breathing
Breathe into your nose and breathe out through you mouth at least two times. Make sure that each exhale is as long as your inhale. This helps with training your diaphragm to do most of the work while breathing, which builds up the strength to fill and empty your lungs.

If you begin to feel dizzy while practicing any of these exercises, stop immediately.Once you feel better, try again. If the dizziness continues, you should contact your doctor for help.

 

refernce : Jason Hughes, tricounty

OxygenWorldwide supplies medical oxygen in Dubai

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As Dubai is becoming an increasingly popular holiday destination, OxygenWorldwide has set up a local depot with medical oxygen equipment. From today (March 2016) we can arrange oxygen for you in aluminium cylinders as small as 2 ltr. If you need to be mobile these small light cylinders are an alternative to the portable oxygen concentrator (POC) that we are hoping to be able to have available soon in Dubai too. Please check with our call centre (24/7 in 5 languages) by e-mail info@oxygenworldwide.com or call (+34) 96 688 28 73 to see if we have POC’s available yet in Dubai.

We have also larger cylinders like a 4,5 Ltr., 9 Ltr. and 45 Ltr. Available, which can be delivered with a trolley if needed.

Many people use Dubai as a stopover for longer flights such as to other places in the southern hemisphere. Dubai is great for shopping and of course as an oxygen patient/user you will need to be mobile. Our main objective is therefore to organise for you predominantly mobile equipment in Dubai. The fantastic climate in Dubai gives you the opportunity to spend lots of time on the beach, even if you are using oxygen.

With 22 years of experience we at OxygenWorldwide understand the needs of oxygen users and we will do our utmost to meet your requirements. If you are travelling with your own portable oxygen concentrator but you need a back-up provision in case your POC has broken down or you do not want to rely 24 hours on your POC (as not all POC’s can be used on a 24 hour basis) we can of course arrange a back-up cylinder in your hotel, resort etc.

OxygenWorldwide is active in more than 100 countries. In a number of these countries do we provide a Airport Service (A.S.). This means that we will have, on your arrival, someone at the door of the aircraft to hand you over a portable oxygen device so you can make your way to your hotel etc. with oxygen. On your departure we will again have someone at the door of the aircraft, who will collect the equipment again from you. If there are cases, due to custom regulations, that we cannot meet you at the door of the aircraft then we will have someone meet you in another place within the airport. Please contact us to find out what possibilities there are in Dubai and in other countries. We hope you will have a great stay in Dubai.

Working with COPD

COPD can have a devastating impact upon your personal life but if you are also aged 45-65 it can also have an even greater impact on your job.  Work-loss for COPD patients is not just due to COPD alone but also due to the other associated medical problems that coexist with COPD. Not being able to work has an impact on the rest of your life, from financial worries to personal fulfillment.

What-is-COPD

Results from a cross-sectional survey of 2,426 people with COPD living and working in 6 countries around the world (Brazil, China, Germany, Turkey, United States and United Kingdom) revealed the following:
•    80% were unable to maintain their previous lifestyle.
•    One in four felt they could not continue to care for their children or other members of their family as they once did.
•    One in five felt they had become a burden to family members and friends.
•    41% felt they could no longer plan for their future.
•    37% reported their income had dropped since being diagnosed.
However some people still manage to continue working until retirement. It depends on your job role; will it make your condition worse by continuing to work in that role or is there an option to change roles or career so that you can still work? If this is not possible then you can claim long-term disability which will give you some income.
If however you feel that you can continue employment then there are things that you and your employer can do to make your work life less of a burden on your disease. The employer will welcome that a few changes will help to ensure that you don’t take as many days off from work for being ill.

Here are just a few accommodations that employers can make that are not overly imposing:
•    Providing an accessible parking space that is close to the door.
•    Moving your workstation closer to the entrance of the building.
•    Allowing you to work from home at least a couple of days a week, if not every day.
•    Providing a smoke-free, dust-free, fume-free environment. This can even mean asking other employees not to wear heavy colognes or perfumes.
•    Providing adequate ventilation.
•    Allowing you a flexible schedule so that you don’t miss your doctor appointments or perhaps letting you come in later on certain days.
•    Giving you advanced notification of any construction work or cleaning that will be going on in your particular work area.
•    Allowing you to use a scooter or motorized cart to increase your mobility while in the workplace or to move from one office building to the next during work hours.
If your employer makes changes to help you then you must try to ensure that you are as productive as possible in return:
•    Doing everything you can to prevent COPD exacerbation. An exacerbation can cause you to miss more days of work, or worse yet, land you in the hospital. Frequent hand-washing, staying away from crowds and sick people and getting your vaccinations will all help.
•    Wearing your oxygen at work. Oxygen therapy helps prevent breathlessness, improves your mental alertness and increases your stamina so you can get through your work day. If you feel conspicuous with your nasal canula then there are oxygen glasses you can try or tracheal oxygen may be an option as you can hide the tubes with a scarf or a high-neckline top.

People with COPD are more likely to accept early retirement than those who do not have COPD and this can negatively impact your pension benefits and have a dramatic affect on your financial well-being, as well as that of your family.
Before deciding on retirement you should ensure you have explored with your doctor and your employer all possible avenues of adapting your workplace environment and tried different medications before giving up on work completely.  You can also talk to a financial adviser to see what else you could do to ensure that you and your family are well taken care of.

References: http://copd.about.com

PINEAPPLE JUICE COULD HELP WITH YOUR COUGH

Pineapple juice has been shown to be 5 times more effective than cough syrup. It fights infection, kills bacteria, loosens mucus and suppresses coughs.

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Pineapple juice contains an enzyme called bromelain, which has anti-inflammatory properties and is effective to combat lung inflammation. It is used to treat arthritis and is also used in the treatment of inflammation and swelling in the nose and sinuses. 1 cup also contains half of your daily requirement of Vitamin C intake. Vitamin C is essential because as well as many other uses, it also enables your body to metabolize certain vital enzymes that regulate your metabolism and manage energy. Pineapple juice also contains manganese, which is a mineral that helps form healthy connective tissue and bones. It also works to absorb more calcium, metabolize carbohydrates and fats and increases regular nerve function. Pineapple juice helps to soothe sore throats and helps to loosen and expel mucus from your lungs more easily.

The study also indicates that the bromelain naturally present in pineapple may provide similar effects if the cough you suffer from is due to asthma. Pineapple juice has also been used to treat other respiratory ailments such as bronchitis, hay fever, asthma and pneumonia. It’s even being tested as a possible treatment for cancer and HIV.

Drinking pineapple juice instead of cough syrup is less expensive and has no toxic chemicals. Also a study also showed that when using pineapple juice patients recovered nearly 5 times faster from their ailments and exhibited a decrease in other symptoms related to coughing such as hacking.

If you suffer from persistent coughing from respiratory conditions such as COPD and asthma then by drinking pineapple juice not only does it soothe related ailments from persistent coughing but it suppresses the cough and helps to loosen mucus build-up and also aids in combating lung inflammation. This in itself can hugely improve your quality of life, help you to breathe better and help to reduce your symptoms and improve your condition. The naturally-occuring components also have other health benefits to aid in your overall health.

References: http://preventdisease.com and http://www.survivalmagazine.org

Breathing is the key to…breathing!

Those that suffer with respiratory conditions such as COPD and Asthma often need supplemental oxygen to aid in delivering more oxygen to the body. However some still find breathing difficult. Struggling to breathe properly may only be noticeable to some when trying to perform strenuous tasks or exercise. Two of the most common problems are over-breathing (hyperventilation) and mouth breathing, which both can have huge health impacts, particularly during exercise.

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You may think that you know how to breathe properly, we all do it every day in order to stay alive however many of us breathe in such a way that it puts our health in jeopardy. If we can breathe correctly then we will be able to ensure that the most efficient amount of oxygen possible is reaching our lungs and reduces any related health problems and improves quality of life for those with respiratory conditions.

HYPERVENTILATION:

Over-Breathing is defined as ‘breathing in excess of metabolic requirements of the body at that time’ and traits include:

  • Mouth breathing
  • Frequent sighing
  • Taking a large breath prior to talking
  • Upper chest moves visibly with each breath
  • Regular sniffing
  • Erratic breathing
  • Noticeable or audible breathing during rest
  • Yawning with big breaths
  • Nasal congestion
  • Sleep apnea

 

Once the pattern of over-breathing has set in it becomes a chronic condition which will require the person to relearn how to breath correctly to break the habit. Chronic over-breathing can lead to various conditions:

  • Heart palpitations and other irregular heart beat conditions
  • Cold hands and feet and numbness
  • Headaches
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness and fainting
  • Muscle cramps
  • Panic attacks
  • Bloating and acid reflux
  • Weakness and exhaustion
  • Poor memory and concentration
  • Sleep disturbances and excess sweating

 

Over-breathing results in removing too much carbon-dioxide from the body. Carbon-dioxide is seen as just a waste product of breathing however the body does need a small amount as it helps to maintain your blood pH.

Over-breathing results in more air being inhaled but it actually reduces the amount of oxygen being delivered to the body and it can lead to constriction of the arteries.

DYSFUNCTIONAL BREATHING:

Those with Asthma and Sleep apnea tend to breath in up to 3 times as much air as those who breathe normally, which happens due to breathing deeper and more frequently.

This dysfunctional breathing can be caused by:

  • Processed foods which form acid
  • Overeating
  • Stress
  • Asthma
  • Thinking that it’s good practise to take big deep breaths
  • Lack of exercise
  • Genetic predisposition
  • High temperature indoors
  • Excessive talking

 

Stress plays a huge role as many of us suffer this on a frequent basis. If you chronically over-breathe then it does not take much to push your body over the edge, even a minor stressful event can provoke symptoms such as heart problems or a panic attack. It isn’t in fact due to the stress factor but to the chronic over-breathing. A traditional solution to panic attacks was to breathe into a paper bag however a more permanent solution is to address the way you breathe. Conventional advice of deep breathing actually worsens the situation and in fact the best way to address stress is to slow down your breathing and to breathe lightly. This reduces the number of breaths per minute and also the amount of air volume being inhaled.

HOW TO BREATHE BETTER:

Ideally your breathing should be light, soft and gentle to the point where the fine hairs in the nostrils remain motionless. Also importantly you should breath through your nose and not your mouth. In fact your nose performs around 30 different functions which are all important linked to your lungs, heart and other organs. Nose breathing is also important as there is nitric oxide in your nose which is carried down to your lungs and it helps to maintain homeostasis in your body and helps to open your airways and blood vessels as well as having antibacterial properties. It also reduces the tendency to take in a bigger breath than is necessary.

The Buteyko Breathing Method:

There is a simple test you can do to measure your levels of carbon dioxide:

  1. Sit straight without crossing your legs and breathe comfortably and steadily.
  2. Take a small, silent breath in and out through your nose. After exhaling, pinch your nose to keep air from entering.
  3. Start counting and hold your breath until you feel the first definite desire to breathe.
  4. When you feel the first urge to breathe, resume breathing and note the time. The urge to breathe may come in the form of involuntary movements of your breathing muscles, or your tummy may jerk or your throat may contract. This is not a breath holding competition — what you’re measuring is how long you can comfortably and naturally hold your breath.
  5. Your inhalation should be calm and controlled, through your nose. If you feel like you must take a big breath, then you held your breath too long.

The time you just measured is called the ‘control pause’ or CP, and it reflects the tolerance of your body to carbon dioxide.

  • CP 40 to 60 seconds: Indicates a normal, healthy breathing pattern, and excellent physical endurance
  • CP 20 to 40 seconds: Indicates mild breathing impairment, moderate tolerance to physical exercise, and potential for health problems in the future (most folks fall into this category)
  • CP 10 to 20 seconds: Indicates significant breathing impairment and poor tolerance to physical exercise; nasal breath training and lifestyle modifications are recommended (potential areas are poor diet, overweight, excess stress, excess alcohol, etc.)
  • CP under 10 seconds: Serious breathing impairment, very poor exercise tolerance, and chronic health problems.

The shorter your CP then the more breathless you’ll get during exercise. If it is less than 20 seconds then never breathe your mouth when exercising and especially if you suffer from asthma. By increasing your CP even by 5 seconds will result in you feeling better and improve your exercise tolerance.

To improve your CP you should follow the following breath hold exercise. However if you suffer from cardiac problems, high blood pressure, panic attacks, are pregnant or have Type 1 Diabetes then ensure you do not hold your breath beyond the first urges to breathe.

Repeat the following exercise several times in succession, waiting about 30 to 60 seconds in between rounds, and do the exercise on a regular basis.

  • Sit up straight.
  • Take a small breath in through your nose, and a small breath out.
  • Pinch your nose with your fingers and hold your breath. Keep your mouth closed.
  • Gently nod your head or sway your body until you feel that you cannot hold your breath any longer. (Hold your nose until you feel a strong desire to breathe.)
  • When you need to breathe in, let go of your nose, and breathe gently through it, in and out, with your mouth closed.
  • Calm your breathing as soon as possible.

By retraining yourself to breathe correctly and more efficiently it can have a hugely noticeable impact upon your breathing, oxygen delivery, health, ability to exercise and overall quality of life.

 

References: http://articles.mercola.com and http://www.buteykoclinic.com