Saving lives since the 1900s

Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a significant cause of death, accounting for 1 in 10 deaths worldwide.

heart
A study in to whether oxygen therapy in patients that have suspected heart conditions is being conducted.

International guidelines recommend improving or decreasing the cardiac workload using a combination of therapies known as MONA: morphine, oxygen, nitrates, and aspirin.

Oxygen, via face mask or nasal cannula, is often administered to patients with suspected AMI.

According to Dion Stub, MBBS, PhD, from The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, treating AMI with oxygen has its roots in practices dating back more than a century. “Oxygen was first administered to patients with suspected ACS in 1900, and to this day is given to [more than] 90% of patients with cardiac emergencies. Whilst other medical practices from the early 1900s — such as starvation diets for aneurysms and mercury as a treatment for infections — were quickly discarded, the routine use of oxygen in cardiac emergencies has remained a pervasive component of first medical response,” Dr Stub told Cardiology Advisor.

Oxygen therapy may decrease cardiac blood flow and perfusion, reduce cardiac output, and increase coronary vascular resistance.

In 2010, Juan Cabello, MD, PhD, from Hospital General Universitario de Alicante in Spain, and colleagues published a review of the literature for oxygen therapy in AMI conducted to determine whether this practice is helpful or harmful. They found that robust evidence to support the use of oxygen to treat AMI was lacking.

The uncertainty of whether oxygen therapy in AMI is beneficial or harmful has stimulated the development of clinical trials examining this question.

According to Dr Cabello, no firm recommendation can be made regarding oxygen therapy for AMI given the low quality and scarcity of the available clinical trial evidence. “The message for clinicians is that we still do not know if oxygen is helpful, harmful, or useless,” he said. “There are theoretical reasons why it could help and also why it could do harm.”

“This updated Cochrane Review further emphasizes the message that oxygen should be treated like all other medical therapies, in which efficacy needs to be balanced with the side effect profile,” Dr Stub said.

References: http://www.thecardiologyadvisor.com

Oxygen is used to heal wounds!

What is HBOT?

HBOT (Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy) is merging as an advancement in treating diseases such as wounds, infections, Alzheimer’s and infertility to help towards healing. This is such a great advancement that can help many people today and is likely to grow in these types of devices.

HBOT is widely being used especially with people who have diabetes due to the complications of poor circulation which in many cases leads to loses of limbs.

oxygen-thumb

How does HBOT work?

The patient inhales the oxygen which stimulates the atmospheric pressing of being 33 feet below sea level and boosts the body’s natural healing process. Recently this type of therapy has been used as an alternative for various conditions like infertility and Alzheimer’s disease.

HBOT helps provide more oxygen to the body’s tissues so they could work efficiently. Additional oxygen can enhance the healing of damaged tissue, boost tissue function and fight infection.

It is an exciting time for medicine and look forward to seeing this treatment heal and save many more patients.

References: http://www.counselheal.com/articles/30572/20170117/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-promising-new-way-to-treat-diseases.htm

Being inactive can give you asthma

couch

Leading an inactive lifestyle can increase a person’s risk of poluution related asthma according to scientists in the USA.

The scientists found that, after being exposed to ozone the inactive tests shouwed inflammation in the lungs – a symptom of asthma. Exposure to ozone impacted on the breathing rate of both groups.

Ground-level ozone is a type of pollution created by chemical reactions between the sun’s rays and organic gases and oxides of nitrogen emitted by cars, power plants, industrial boilers, refineries, chemical plants and other sources.

The researchers argue that this finding could also be similar among humans, but further research is needed.

reference: http://www.europeanlung.org

Can meat be bad for asthma?

Experts say people should eat no more than 70g a day of red and processed meat for good health with processed meat possibly making asthma symptoms worse.

meat

A study carried out in France ‘journal Thorax’ believe the preservative nitrite used in sausages, ham and salami may make these symptoms worse. The survey looked specifically at asthma symptoms – breathlessness, wheeze, chest tightness – and intake of cured meat: a single portion was two slices of ham, one sausage or two slices of salami.

“People who said they consumed more than four portions a week – eight slices of ham or four sausages, for example – had the biggest deterioration of their asthma by the end of the study.”

 

The experts stress that their work cannot prove diet is definitely to blame. There are lots of factors in a person’s life that can make their asthma worse.

references: bbcnews.co.uk

Stephen Hawking takes a breakth and visits the Vatican

stephen-hawking

Stephen Hawking’s visit to the Vatican last month with Oxygen provided by our team. As stated online from the Catholic News Agency, Hawking is a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences – which includes 80 of the most brilliant scientists in the world – and he was in Vatican City for the group’s annual meeting. Hawking himself gave a talk on “The Origin of the Universe,” the topic that has earned him world renown.

His many publications include The Large Scale Structure of Spacetime with G F R Ellis, General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey, with W Israel, and 300 Years of Gravity, with W Israel. Among the popular books Stephen Hawking has published are his best seller A Brief History of Time, Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays, The Universe in a Nutshell, The Grand Design and My Brief History.

Professor Hawking has twelve honorary degrees. He was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989. He is the recipient of many awards, medals and prizes, is a Fellow of The Royal Society and a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences.

Stephen was diagnosed with ALS, a form of Motor Neurone Disease, shortly after his 21st birthday. In spite of being wheelchair bound and dependent on a computerised voice system for communication Stephen Hawking continues to combine family life (he has three children and three grandchildren), and his research into theoretical physics together with an extensive programme of travel and public lectures.

During his conference at Casina Pio IV, Stephen Hawking paid homage to Msgr. George Lemaitre, president of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences from 1960 to 1966. Hawking said that Msgr. Lemaitre was the real father of the “Big Bang Theory,” thus dismissing the common belief that the father of the theory was the U.S. naturalized physicist George Gamow.

 

References

Christmas check list

xmasChristmas is a time for friends, family and a lot of preparing gifts, journeys, cards to send but most of all do not get too stressed and rushed and forget to look after yourself or your family’s health over the festive period.

Plan ahead:

  • Order any repeat prescriptions you may need especially if you are going away for the festive season.

 

  1. Check that you have enough oxygen supply for the Christmas period.
  2. If you are going away make sure you make arrangements for any oxygen that you need.
  3. Also look out for lonely, vulnerable neighbours and friends during the winter period, that may need your help or even conversation.
  4. Stay warm during the festive time – make sure you pre-programme your heating for when you are going to be in and set your thermostat to a suitable temperature.
  5. If you are ordering a supply of oxygen make sure you have registered with OxygenWorldwide so any concerns whilst away can be dealt with 24/7
  6. Have a lovely Christmas!!!!

10 tips for winter

Cold, dry air and an increased risk of upper respiratory infections can worsen asthma symptoms during the winter. Washing your hands frequently, exercising indoors, and taking other healthy steps can help you keep a handle on asthma attacks.

  1. Wash your hands! 
  2. Don’t sit by the fireplace. “The more evidence we have, the more we realize that burning wood is like burning tobacco,” explains Todd Rambasek, MD, of ENT & Allergy Health Services in Cleveland.
  3. Keep your mouth closed. Ideally, you want to breathe through your nose, not your mouth, when you’re out in the cold because the nose warms up the air for the lungs, Dr. Rambasek says.
  4. Replace filters. Your home heating system may blow dust and debris throughout your house, especially when you first start it up for the winter. It’s important to clean and replace filters before turning on your system so as not to release the debris.
  5. Exercise indoors. On days when it’s bitterly cold outside and the wind chill makes it feel like it’s below zero, Li recommends going to the gym instead of exercising outside. “The temperatures and the humidity in the gym are less likely to cause a problem,” she says.
  6. Warm up before working out. A recent study showed that people with asthma recover faster and have greater lung function after exercising when they are warmed up.
  7. Take steps to prevent asthma flares. Take a preventive dose of your asthma medicine before heading outside, whether to exercise, walk the dog, or run errands.
  8. Have an asthma action plan. No matter what the season, you should always know what to do if your asthma symptoms flare.
  9. Take your medications. It’s important to follow your treatment plan regardless of the time of year. Don’t let a busy work or social schedule cause you to ignore your health.

Keeping your asthma under control may take a little more effort in the cold of winter, but these strategies should get you through the season without worsened symptoms.

References: http://www.everydayhealth.com/