Want to imrove your breathing and wellbeing?

Can Yoga Help When You Have COPD?

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Many people who suffer from COPD find it hard to exercise. But not exercising worsens their lung condition rapidly, which makes it even more difficult to perform any kind of activity. This way they find themselves in a vicious circle where they feel there is no escape from. Especially for these people yoga is the best exercise, as it is a low impact activity that improves your physical as well as your emotional health. It reduces stress and anxiety, increases relaxation and self-confidence, and improves fitness in general.

Yoga can help relieve the symptoms of COPD

Yoga has its roots in Eastern philosophy, and many people still think it is mainly a spiritual and religious experience. But most yoga classes for people with health problems do not focus on this at all. It is mainly a “mind-body practice”, as the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine describes it., which is especially beneficial for people with COPD. The American Journal of Therapeutics published a study performed in 2012, that showed these benefits clearly. In this study a group of 33 COPD patients followed a yoga class given by a certified yoga therapist for six weeks in sessions of one hour, three times a week. They were taught yoga postures, breathing exercises and meditation techniques. After the six weeks, the medical tests showed an improvement in lung function and the patients themselves reported that their overall quality of life had improved significantly.

Yoga offers various benefits for people with COPD

First of all, it is an easy way to exercise. Most exercises are stationary and performed sitting or standing. These physical postures, also called asanas, encourage your flexibility and build up your physical strength, thus helping you to increase your exercise tolerance. Yoga classes set up for COPD patients do not contain complicated poses, but just gentle stretching and bending exercises, designed especially with the health needs of people with COPD in mind. Together with the breathing exercises, the so-called pranayamas, which will teach you how to manage attacks of breathlessness, they will give you all the tools you need to effectively manage both your physical and your emotional well-being. All the techniques are normally easy enough to also practice at home.

Second, there is the social interaction you will be able to build up with your fellow students. You can exchange experiences with others in the same or similar condition as you are, so the feeling of isolation, being one of a kind, will reduce. And the mere fact of spending time with other people on a regular basis will undoubtedly help improve your overall mood, as it does to all of us. This makes it a fun sociable activity, which should be easy to keep up!

And last, but may be not least, it can be a big help to those COPD patients that, despite their disease, cannot manage to quit smoking. Trying to stop this habit can lead to stress and anxiety, which does not help the condition of especially COPD patients, and may even have an adverse effect. Practicing yoga can be a big help in relieving these stress symptoms caused by smoking cessation and increase the chance of a successful attempt to quit. This is a suggestion endorsed by the American Lung Association.

Yoga is a safe way of exercise for people with lung diseases

Especially for people suffering from emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and other lung diseases that are generally known as COPD, yoga is one of the best ways to keep a health condition as good as possible through exercise. Of course, before you begin, consult with your doctor and ask his advice. Maybe he or she will also know certified yoga teachers in your neighbourhood with good credentials for training COPD patients. And always remember to keep your inhaler at hand, just in case. With these precautions taken, nothing stands in your way to improve your physical and mental wellbeing with the aid of yoga!

 

 

 

Oxygen therapy… So many uses!

In the 1930s, when subways were being dug in Europe, there was a fairly high incidence of the decompression condition known as Caisson’s disease, most likely caused by blast exposure. And in that group, of patients there was a high incidence of suicide.

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Today, we usually treat a similar decompression condition called the bends, which occasionally happens to scuba divers, with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT). After such treatment, there is no increased incidence of suicide.

In William Maxfield’s (one of the nation’s foremost experts in hyperbaric medicine) new book, “The Oxygen Cure,” there is data about use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat strokes. You can go to the website Bcenter.com and look up the response of Valerie Greene who was 30 when she had her stroke. At that time she could not walk or talk. Today she can, and is now a spokesman for the Stroke Association.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to help with chemotherapy, infection, radiation therapy effects, epilepsy, fibromyalgia, emphysema, asthma, ADHD, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiac disease, migraine headaches, vertigo, early dementia, vision loss, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and of course traumatic brain injury and PTSD.

William S. Maxfield, M.D., is a board-certified physician in hyperbaric medicine, radiology, and nuclear medicine. He is one of the nation’s foremost experts in hyperbaric medicine, pioneering its use to treat wounds, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions.

ref: http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Dr-Maxfield/oxygen-therapy-scuba-diving-veterans/2017/01/18/id/769188/

Saving lives since the 1900s

Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a significant cause of death, accounting for 1 in 10 deaths worldwide.

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A study in to whether oxygen therapy in patients that have suspected heart conditions is being conducted.

International guidelines recommend improving or decreasing the cardiac workload using a combination of therapies known as MONA: morphine, oxygen, nitrates, and aspirin.

Oxygen, via face mask or nasal cannula, is often administered to patients with suspected AMI.

According to Dion Stub, MBBS, PhD, from The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, treating AMI with oxygen has its roots in practices dating back more than a century. “Oxygen was first administered to patients with suspected ACS in 1900, and to this day is given to [more than] 90% of patients with cardiac emergencies. Whilst other medical practices from the early 1900s — such as starvation diets for aneurysms and mercury as a treatment for infections — were quickly discarded, the routine use of oxygen in cardiac emergencies has remained a pervasive component of first medical response,” Dr Stub told Cardiology Advisor.

Oxygen therapy may decrease cardiac blood flow and perfusion, reduce cardiac output, and increase coronary vascular resistance.

In 2010, Juan Cabello, MD, PhD, from Hospital General Universitario de Alicante in Spain, and colleagues published a review of the literature for oxygen therapy in AMI conducted to determine whether this practice is helpful or harmful. They found that robust evidence to support the use of oxygen to treat AMI was lacking.

The uncertainty of whether oxygen therapy in AMI is beneficial or harmful has stimulated the development of clinical trials examining this question.

According to Dr Cabello, no firm recommendation can be made regarding oxygen therapy for AMI given the low quality and scarcity of the available clinical trial evidence. “The message for clinicians is that we still do not know if oxygen is helpful, harmful, or useless,” he said. “There are theoretical reasons why it could help and also why it could do harm.”

“This updated Cochrane Review further emphasizes the message that oxygen should be treated like all other medical therapies, in which efficacy needs to be balanced with the side effect profile,” Dr Stub said.

References: http://www.thecardiologyadvisor.com

Oxygen is used to heal wounds!

What is HBOT?

HBOT (Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy) is merging as an advancement in treating diseases such as wounds, infections, Alzheimer’s and infertility to help towards healing. This is such a great advancement that can help many people today and is likely to grow in these types of devices.

HBOT is widely being used especially with people who have diabetes due to the complications of poor circulation which in many cases leads to loses of limbs.

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How does HBOT work?

The patient inhales the oxygen which stimulates the atmospheric pressing of being 33 feet below sea level and boosts the body’s natural healing process. Recently this type of therapy has been used as an alternative for various conditions like infertility and Alzheimer’s disease.

HBOT helps provide more oxygen to the body’s tissues so they could work efficiently. Additional oxygen can enhance the healing of damaged tissue, boost tissue function and fight infection.

It is an exciting time for medicine and look forward to seeing this treatment heal and save many more patients.

References: http://www.counselheal.com/articles/30572/20170117/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-promising-new-way-to-treat-diseases.htm

Being inactive can give you asthma

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Leading an inactive lifestyle can increase a person’s risk of poluution related asthma according to scientists in the USA.

The scientists found that, after being exposed to ozone the inactive tests shouwed inflammation in the lungs – a symptom of asthma. Exposure to ozone impacted on the breathing rate of both groups.

Ground-level ozone is a type of pollution created by chemical reactions between the sun’s rays and organic gases and oxides of nitrogen emitted by cars, power plants, industrial boilers, refineries, chemical plants and other sources.

The researchers argue that this finding could also be similar among humans, but further research is needed.

reference: http://www.europeanlung.org

Can meat be bad for asthma?

Experts say people should eat no more than 70g a day of red and processed meat for good health with processed meat possibly making asthma symptoms worse.

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A study carried out in France ‘journal Thorax’ believe the preservative nitrite used in sausages, ham and salami may make these symptoms worse. The survey looked specifically at asthma symptoms – breathlessness, wheeze, chest tightness – and intake of cured meat: a single portion was two slices of ham, one sausage or two slices of salami.

“People who said they consumed more than four portions a week – eight slices of ham or four sausages, for example – had the biggest deterioration of their asthma by the end of the study.”

 

The experts stress that their work cannot prove diet is definitely to blame. There are lots of factors in a person’s life that can make their asthma worse.

references: bbcnews.co.uk

Stephen Hawking takes a breakth and visits the Vatican

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Stephen Hawking’s visit to the Vatican last month with Oxygen provided by our team. As stated online from the Catholic News Agency, Hawking is a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences – which includes 80 of the most brilliant scientists in the world – and he was in Vatican City for the group’s annual meeting. Hawking himself gave a talk on “The Origin of the Universe,” the topic that has earned him world renown.

His many publications include The Large Scale Structure of Spacetime with G F R Ellis, General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey, with W Israel, and 300 Years of Gravity, with W Israel. Among the popular books Stephen Hawking has published are his best seller A Brief History of Time, Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays, The Universe in a Nutshell, The Grand Design and My Brief History.

Professor Hawking has twelve honorary degrees. He was awarded the CBE in 1982, and was made a Companion of Honour in 1989. He is the recipient of many awards, medals and prizes, is a Fellow of The Royal Society and a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences.

Stephen was diagnosed with ALS, a form of Motor Neurone Disease, shortly after his 21st birthday. In spite of being wheelchair bound and dependent on a computerised voice system for communication Stephen Hawking continues to combine family life (he has three children and three grandchildren), and his research into theoretical physics together with an extensive programme of travel and public lectures.

During his conference at Casina Pio IV, Stephen Hawking paid homage to Msgr. George Lemaitre, president of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences from 1960 to 1966. Hawking said that Msgr. Lemaitre was the real father of the “Big Bang Theory,” thus dismissing the common belief that the father of the theory was the U.S. naturalized physicist George Gamow.

 

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